Female Medical Packages


Standard Wellwoman Medical (1 Hour): £650

Procedures:

– Full medical History
– Height, Weight, Abdominal Circumference
– Blood Pressure
– Full examination (heart / Lungs / Abdomen / skin / eyes / nose / throat)
– Breast Examination
– Urinalysis and Culture
– Bowel Screen (if required)

Tests:

– Full blood count
– Liver, Kidney, Bone profile
– Lipids (Full Cholesterol Profile)
– Vitamin D
– Ferritin and Iron
– ESR Inflammation Marker
– Glucose Screen

Not Included:
– Smear/HPV which will be an additional cost of £196 (Please click here to see new 2019 smear guidelines where HPV screening is now mandatory at the end of the female packages)


Enhanced Wellwoman Medical (1 Hour): £860

Procedures:

– Full medical History
– Height, Weight, Abdominal Circumference
– Blood Pressure
– Full examination (heart / Lungs / Abdomen / skin / eyes / nose / throat)
– Breast Examination
– Urinalysis
– Bowel Screen (if required)
– Vitamin Screening

Tests:

– Full blood count
– Liver, Kidney, Bone profile
– Lipids (Full Cholesterol Profile)
– Vitamin D
– Ferritin and Iron
– ESR Inflammation Marker
– Diabetes: HBA1C
– Urine Culture
– B12, Folate

Not Included:
– Smear/HPV which will be an additional cost of £196 (Please click here to see new 2019 smear guidelines where HPV screening is now mandatory at the end of the female packages)


Comprehensive Gold Female Medical (1 Hour): £1195

Procedures:

– Full Medical History
– Height, Weight, Abdominal Circumference
– Blood Pressure
– Full examination (heart / Lungs / Abdomen / skin / eyes / nose / throat)
– Breast Examination
– Urinalysis
– Inclusive of ECG

Tests:

– Full Blood Profile as above
– Infection Markers – CRP
– Stool screen for bowel cancer (FOB)
– Full Urinalysis
– Ovarian Cancer Screen
– Cardiac Screening Markers
– Diabetic Screen (HBA1C) Not Included:

Not Included:
– Smear/HPV which will be an additional cost of £196 (Please click here to see new 2019 smear guidelines where HPV screening is now mandatory at the end of the female packages)


Female Platinum Medical (1 Hour 30 Minutes): £1,550

Procedures:

– Full Medical History
– Height, Weight, Abdominal Circumference
– Blood Pressure
– Full examination (heart / Lungs / Abdomen / skin / eyes / nose / throat)
– Breast Examination and examination of lymph nodes
– Urinalysis
– ECG
– Hearing Test
– Cancer Focus (Family Risk, Personal Risk)

Tests:

– Full Blood Profile (Full Blood Count)
– Liver, Kidney, Bone Profile
– Lipids (Full Cholesterol Profile)
– Vitamin D
– Ferritin and Iron
– ESR Inflammation marker
– Ovarian Cancer Screening
– Infection Markers (CRP)
– Stool screen for bowel cancer (FOB)
– Full Urinalysis
– Cardiac Screening Markers
– Diabetic Screen (HBA1C)
– Cancer Markers (CEA-Gut/bowel, Pancreas, Ovarian Cancer screen)
– Smear/HPV


Cervical screening and Human Papillomavirus (HPV) testing Guidelines

This is a test carried out on the sample of cells we take during cervical screening test (smear). It makes no difference to what happens at your screening appointment. Whereas before screening of the cells of the neck of womb for abnormalities would take place first, Public Health England have now changed screening to look for HPV (human papilloma virus) as the first test on screening samples. This reason for this is that HPV is the responsible for 99% of cervical cancers, and screening in this way means that a negative test indicates very low risks of developing cervical disease/ abnormalities.
You may hear it being called ‘HPV primary screening’. It helps us to more quickly identify who may need treatment, and who can simply be called back for screening in 3 or 5 years’ time.

What is HPV?

HPV is a very common virus. Most women get it at some point in their lives. HPV can be easily passed on during sexual activity between partners. Some types of HPV can cause abnormal cells in the cervix.

HPV primary screening

Once your cervical screening sample is sent to the laboratory, it will first be tested for HPV. If HPV is found, your sample will also be looked at for abnormal cells. Looking for abnormal cells is called ‘cytology’. If you don’t have HPV, then it is extremely unlikely that you will have any abnormal cervical cells.
Testing for HPV first should benefit women Because:
• More abnormal cervical cells will be picked up
• Women without HPV can be reassured that they are at extremely low risk of developing cervical cancer (although we cannot say ‘no risk’)

Screening results

There are 3 main types of result from HPV Primary screening.

No HPV found (HPV negative).

If no HPV is found then no further tests will be done. If you don’t have HPV, it is highly unlikely that you will have any abnormal cervical cells. Even if you did, it would be extremely unlikely that they would cause a problem. You will simply be called back for screening again in 1, 3 or 5 years’ time (depending on your age).

HPV found (HPV positive) but no abnormal cervical cells found

If HPV is found, the sample will also be tested for abnormal cervical cells. If none are found, your result will say you have HPV, but no abnormal cells. You will be asked to come for screening again in 12 months’ time. This is so we can check that your immune system has cleared the HPV (this happens in most cases). If it hasn’t cleared, you may be at greater risk of developing abnormal cervical cells. If the HPV infection continues you will be referred for colposcopy (further examination of the neck of the womb).

HPV found (HPV positive) and abnormal cervical cells found

There are several grades of abnormal cells. Your result letter will explain what your results mean. If you have HPV and any grade of abnormal cervical cells you will be referred for colposcopy. Colposcopy is a closer examination of the cervix. It is carried out in a similar way to cervical screening.

It is also possible to have an ‘inadequate’ result. This may be due to a technical problem, such as if the laboratory cannot get a HPV test result from your sample, or cannot see if abnormal cells are present or not.

If you have an inadequate result, you may be asked to have cervical screening again in 3 months’ time. We wait so that there are enough cells again to get a sample from.

Can HPV be treated?

No, there isn’t a treatment to get rid of the virus. For most women, their immune system will get rid of HPV – like getting rid of a common cold. But we can treat abnormal cervical cells, especially if they are found early on. Early treatment means that cervical cancer can be prevented.